Archive for August, 2009

Obama's "green jobs czar" an enviro wacko and self-described communist

08/30/2009

“Standing Together to Organize a Revolutionary Movement (STORM), the revolutionary group formed by self-described “communist” and “rowdy black nationalist” Van Jones, held a vigil in Oakland, California, “mourning the victims of U.S. imperialism around the world” on the night after Sept. 11, 2001.

The reason this is important is because Van Jones is now President Obama’s green jobs czar. He does not appear to have distanced himself from his past communist activities and is now part of the Obama administration’s push to turn Sept. 11 into a National Day of Service focused on the promotion of the radical environmentalist agenda.” “Van Jones and his STORMtroopers denounced America the night after 9/11

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Obama’s "green jobs czar" an enviro wacko and self-described communist

08/30/2009

“Standing Together to Organize a Revolutionary Movement (STORM), the revolutionary group formed by self-described “communist” and “rowdy black nationalist” Van Jones, held a vigil in Oakland, California, “mourning the victims of U.S. imperialism around the world” on the night after Sept. 11, 2001.

The reason this is important is because Van Jones is now President Obama’s green jobs czar. He does not appear to have distanced himself from his past communist activities and is now part of the Obama administration’s push to turn Sept. 11 into a National Day of Service focused on the promotion of the radical environmentalist agenda.” “Van Jones and his STORMtroopers denounced America the night after 9/11

Amplification of solar forcing

08/28/2009

“[Abstract]: One of the mysteries regarding Earth’s climate system response to variations in solar output is how the relatively small fluctuations of the 11-year solar cycle can produce the magnitude of the observed climate signals in the tropical Pacific associated with such solar variability. Two mechanisms, the top-down stratospheric response of ozone to fluctuations of shortwave solar forcing and the bottom-up coupled ocean-atmosphere surface response, are included in versions of three global climate models, with either mechanism acting alone or both acting together. We show that the two mechanisms act together to enhance the climatological off-equatorial tropical precipitation maxima in the Pacific, lower the eastern equatorial Pacific sea surface temperatures during peaks in the 11-year solar cycle, and reduce low-latitude clouds to amplify the solar forcing at the surface.

[Text]: It has long been noted that the 11-year cycle of solar forcing is associated with variousphenomena in Earth’s climate system, in both the troposphere and stratosphere (1–9). Because the amplitude of the solar cycle (solar maximum to solar minimum) is relatively small, about 0.2 W m−2 globally averaged (10), and the observed global sea surface temperature (SST) response of about 0.1°C would require more than 0.5Wm−2 (11), there has always been a question regarding how this small solar signal could be amplified to produce a measurable response.

Postulated mechanisms that could amplify the relatively small solar forcing signal to produce such responses in the troposphere include changes in clouds in the troposphere caused by galactic cosmic rays, or associated global atmospheric electric circuit variations, though neither has been plausibly simulated in a climate model. However, there are two other plausible mechanisms, though each has not yet produced a modeled response of the magnitude seen in the observations.

The first involves a “top down” response of stratospheric ozone to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum that varies by a few percent. Peaks in solar forcing cause the enhanced UV radiation, which stimulates additional stratospheric ozone production and UV absorption, thus warming that layer differentially with respect to latitude. The anomalous temperature gradients provide a positive feedback through wave motions to amplify the original solar forcing. The changes in the stratosphere modify tropical tropospheric circulation and thus contribute to an enhancement and poleward expansion of the tropical precipitation maxima (5, 12–16). The first demonstration of the top-down mechanism in a modeling study showed a broadening of the Hadley cells in response to enhanced UV that increased as the solar-induced ozone change was included (17).

A second “bottom up” mechanism that can magnify the response to an initially small solar forcing involves air-sea coupling and interaction with incoming solar radiation at the surface in the relatively cloud-free areas of the subtropics. Thus, peaks in solar forcing produce greater energy input to the ocean surface in these areas, evaporating more moisture, and that moisture is carried by the trade winds to the convergence zones where more precipitation occurs. This intensified precipitation strengthens the Hadley and Walker circulations in the troposphere, with an associated increase in trade wind strength that produces greater equatorial ocean upwelling and lower equatorial SSTs in the eastern Pacific, a signal that was first discovered in observational data (1, 2). The enhanced subsidence produces fewer clouds in the equatorial eastern Pacific and the expanded subtropical regions that allow even more solar radiation to reach the surface to produce a positive feedback (18, 19). Dynamical air-sea coupling produces a transition to higher eastern equatorial SSTs a couple of years later (20, 21). There is observational evidence for a strengthened Hadley circulation in peak solar forcing years associated with intensified tropical precipitation maxima, a stronger descending branch in the subtropics, and a stronger ascending branch in the lower latitudes (3); a poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation in peak solar years, with stronger ascending motions at the edge of the rising branch, as well as a stronger Walker circulation with enhanced upward motions in the tropical western Pacific connected to stronger descending motions in the tropical eastern Pacific (7); and enhanced summer season off-equatorial climatological monsoon precipitation over India (6, 22). This cold event– like response to peak solar forcing is different from cold events (also known as La Niña events) in the Southern Oscillation in that, among other things, zonal wind anomalies in the stratosphere are opposite in sign (23).” “Amplifying the Pacific Climate System Response to a Small 11-Year Solar Cycle Forcing” Article in Space.com. Article in ScienceDaily. Article in Christian Science Monitor. Editorial at SEPP. h/t IceCap

Update on GM-Toyota quitting California

08/28/2009

“Toyota Motor Corp. will shut an assembly plant for the first time in its 72-year history …

New United Motor Manufacturing Inc. [NUMMI] in Fremont, California, will end production of Corolla cars and Tacoma pickups in March 2010, Toyota said in a statement. GM in June said it would end assembly of Pontiac Vibes at the plant, known as Nummi, and quit the venture …

Nummi employs 5,400 people, including 4,550 United Auto Workers union positions. More than 1,000 suppliers work with the factory, which has annual payroll and benefits of $523 million, according to a plant publication. …

Toyota will shift production of Tacoma pickups to San Antonio and move Corollas to its factory in Ontario, Canada. …

Nummi has the capacity to make 420,000 cars and pickups each year. It only made money in 1992, the result of California’s taxes and labor and pollution rules, as well as the plant’s UAW contracts, according to an estimate by Credit Suisse Group AG analyst.” “Toyota Will Shut California Plant in First Closure” prior post here

Amplification of solar forcing

08/28/2009

“[Abstract]: One of the mysteries regarding Earth’s climate system response to variations in solar output is how the relatively small fluctuations of the 11-year solar cycle can produce the magnitude of the observed climate signals in the tropical Pacific associated with such solar variability. Two mechanisms, the top-down stratospheric response of ozone to fluctuations of shortwave solar forcing and the bottom-up coupled ocean-atmosphere surface response, are included in versions of three global climate models, with either mechanism acting alone or both acting together. We show that the two mechanisms act together to enhance the climatological off-equatorial tropical precipitation maxima in the Pacific, lower the eastern equatorial Pacific sea surface temperatures during peaks in the 11-year solar cycle, and reduce low-latitude clouds to amplify the solar forcing at the surface.

[Text]: It has long been noted that the 11-year cycle of solar forcing is associated with variousphenomena in Earth’s climate system, in both the troposphere and stratosphere (1–9). Because the amplitude of the solar cycle (solar maximum to solar minimum) is relatively small, about 0.2 W m−2 globally averaged (10), and the observed global sea surface temperature (SST) response of about 0.1°C would require more than 0.5Wm−2 (11), there has always been a question regarding how this small solar signal could be amplified to produce a measurable response.

Postulated mechanisms that could amplify the relatively small solar forcing signal to produce such responses in the troposphere include changes in clouds in the troposphere caused by galactic cosmic rays, or associated global atmospheric electric circuit variations, though neither has been plausibly simulated in a climate model. However, there are two other plausible mechanisms, though each has not yet produced a modeled response of the magnitude seen in the observations.

The first involves a “top down” response of stratospheric ozone to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum that varies by a few percent. Peaks in solar forcing cause the enhanced UV radiation, which stimulates additional stratospheric ozone production and UV absorption, thus warming that layer differentially with respect to latitude. The anomalous temperature gradients provide a positive feedback through wave motions to amplify the original solar forcing. The changes in the stratosphere modify tropical tropospheric circulation and thus contribute to an enhancement and poleward expansion of the tropical precipitation maxima (5, 12–16). The first demonstration of the top-down mechanism in a modeling study showed a broadening of the Hadley cells in response to enhanced UV that increased as the solar-induced ozone change was included (17).

A second “bottom up” mechanism that can magnify the response to an initially small solar forcing involves air-sea coupling and interaction with incoming solar radiation at the surface in the relatively cloud-free areas of the subtropics. Thus, peaks in solar forcing produce greater energy input to the ocean surface in these areas, evaporating more moisture, and that moisture is carried by the trade winds to the convergence zones where more precipitation occurs. This intensified precipitation strengthens the Hadley and Walker circulations in the troposphere, with an associated increase in trade wind strength that produces greater equatorial ocean upwelling and lower equatorial SSTs in the eastern Pacific, a signal that was first discovered in observational data (1, 2). The enhanced subsidence produces fewer clouds in the equatorial eastern Pacific and the expanded subtropical regions that allow even more solar radiation to reach the surface to produce a positive feedback (18, 19). Dynamical air-sea coupling produces a transition to higher eastern equatorial SSTs a couple of years later (20, 21). There is observational evidence for a strengthened Hadley circulation in peak solar forcing years associated with intensified tropical precipitation maxima, a stronger descending branch in the subtropics, and a stronger ascending branch in the lower latitudes (3); a poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation in peak solar years, with stronger ascending motions at the edge of the rising branch, as well as a stronger Walker circulation with enhanced upward motions in the tropical western Pacific connected to stronger descending motions in the tropical eastern Pacific (7); and enhanced summer season off-equatorial climatological monsoon precipitation over India (6, 22). This cold event– like response to peak solar forcing is different from cold events (also known as La Niña events) in the Southern Oscillation in that, among other things, zonal wind anomalies in the stratosphere are opposite in sign (23).” “Amplifying the Pacific Climate System Response to a Small 11-Year Solar Cycle Forcing” Article in Space.com. Article in ScienceDaily. Article in Christian Science Monitor. Editorial at SEPP. h/t IceCap

Update on GM-Toyota quitting California

08/28/2009

“Toyota Motor Corp. will shut an assembly plant for the first time in its 72-year history …

New United Motor Manufacturing Inc. in Fremont, California, will end production of Corolla cars and Tacoma pickups in March 2010, Toyota said in a statement. GM in June said it would end assembly of Pontiac Vibes at the plant, known as Nummi, and quit the venture …

Nummi employs 5,400 people, including 4,550 United Auto Workers union positions. More than 1,000 suppliers work with the factory, which has annual payroll and benefits of $523 million, according to a plant publication. …

Toyota will shift production of Tacoma pickups to San Antonio and move Corollas to its factory in Ontario, Canada. …

Nummi has the capacity to make 420,000 cars and pickups each year. It only made money in 1992, the result of California’s taxes and labor and pollution rules, as well as the plant’s UAW contracts, according to an estimate by Credit Suisse Group AG analyst.” “Toyota Will Shut California Plant in First Closure” prior post here

Nicola Scafetta on the influence of the Jovian planets on the Sun and Earth's climate

08/27/2009


Attempting a forecast of climate change: An astronomical gravitational forcing for the Sun and the Earth? Presented by Scafetta, at AGU fall meeting 2008” (pp. 62-67) h/t Jeff Id
Prior posts on solar spin-orbit coupling here

Manufactured water crisis

08/27/2009

The article below uses various vague euphemisms (“environmental concerns”, “environmental issues”, “environmental edicts”) and speaks of a “water crisis”, but doesn’t even mention that the whole crisis has been manufactured by enviro lawsuits which forced water restrictions to farmers in favor of a 4-inch bait fish (prior post here), and that without the enviros there would be no crisis and 40,000 farmworkers would not be out of work:

“U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack promised California farmers Wednesday he’ll press for solutions to the water crisis hitting the state’s San Joaquin Valley, one of the most prolific farm regions in the world. …

Farmers kept returning to the issue of drought and water, however, and the state’s outdated system of conveyances that have cut deliveries because of environmental concerns in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. …

The meeting at one of the valley’s largest fruit packing houses came as federal attention has been focused this week on the water crisis crippling the region. A three-year drought, combined with environmental issues that have slowed water deliveries, have forced farmers on the valley’s west side to fallow more than a quarter-million acres.

On Tuesday House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer toured the western Fresno County farm community of Mendota, where idled farmworkers have driven the unemployment rate to nearly 40 percent. …

“It’s important for the secretary of agriculture to understand that California’s water system is broken and the federal government has a role in fixing it,” said [Rep. Jim] Costa [D-CA], who represents much of the region and has been on a nearly full-time mission to find a solution to the water crisis.

Farms on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley depend on water shipped from the north through a system of canals. Tom Birmingham, general manager of the Westlands Water District, said 1 million acres of almonds, tomatoes, lettuce, grapes and other commodities are “in a crisis” because environmental edicts have limited the flow of high-quality water.” “Ag Secretary Assesses Calif. Water Problems

Nicola Scafetta on the influence of the Jovian planets on the Sun and Earth’s climate

08/27/2009


Attempting a forecast of climate change: An astronomical gravitational forcing for the Sun and the Earth? Presented by Scafetta, at AGU fall meeting 2008” (pp. 62-67) h/t Jeff Id
Prior posts on solar spin-orbit coupling here

Manufactured water crisis

08/27/2009

The article below uses various vague euphemisms (“environmental concerns”, “environmental issues”, “environmental edicts”) and speaks of a “water crisis”, but doesn’t even mention that the whole crisis has been manufactured by enviro lawsuits which forced water restrictions to farmers in favor of a 4-inch bait fish (prior post here), and that without the enviros there would be no crisis and 40,000 farmworkers would not be out of work:

“U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack promised California farmers Wednesday he’ll press for solutions to the water crisis hitting the state’s San Joaquin Valley, one of the most prolific farm regions in the world. …

Farmers kept returning to the issue of drought and water, however, and the state’s outdated system of conveyances that have cut deliveries because of environmental concerns in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. …

The meeting at one of the valley’s largest fruit packing houses came as federal attention has been focused this week on the water crisis crippling the region. A three-year drought, combined with environmental issues that have slowed water deliveries, have forced farmers on the valley’s west side to fallow more than a quarter-million acres.

On Tuesday House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer toured the western Fresno County farm community of Mendota, where idled farmworkers have driven the unemployment rate to nearly 40 percent. …

“It’s important for the secretary of agriculture to understand that California’s water system is broken and the federal government has a role in fixing it,” said [Rep. Jim] Costa [D-CA], who represents much of the region and has been on a nearly full-time mission to find a solution to the water crisis.

Farms on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley depend on water shipped from the north through a system of canals. Tom Birmingham, general manager of the Westlands Water District, said 1 million acres of almonds, tomatoes, lettuce, grapes and other commodities are “in a crisis” because environmental edicts have limited the flow of high-quality water.” “Ag Secretary Assesses Calif. Water Problems