Archive for the ‘tropics’ Category

Blast from the past — 2005

11/22/2010

Climate change is a bigger threat to elephants, tigers and the rhinoceroses than poaching, a wildlife expert says.

Dr Richard Leakey told BBC News global warming … could make the animals extinct.  …

And the former director of Kenya’s wildlife service believes concerted action is needed within five years.  …

“We can spend money trying to stop poaching, but there’s no point in doing that if the stuff in there [protected areas such as national parks] is going anyway,” he told the BBC News website.

“If the concern is symbolic species, there may well be a bigger threat from climate change than from utilisation and poaching.”  …

“Protected areas are now islands,” said Dr Leakey.  …

“And if there’s significant climate change, as is predicted [by AGW climate models], what’s going to happen to these areas?

“Paleontologically, island faunas become extinct.”  …

He will attempt to convince representatives of bodies such as the World Bank and the United Nations Environment Programme (Unep) that they should set up a new fund of around $100m to research the issue, and find ways of protecting wildlife from climate change.  …

I think we may well be looking at a mass extinction …””  “Climate fear for African elephant

Willis Eschenbach on negative feedback and "The Thermostat Hypothesis"

06/28/2009

Abstract

The Thermostat Hypothesis is that tropical clouds and thunderstorms actively regulate the temperature of the earth. This keeps the earth at a equilibrium temperature.

Several kinds of evidence are presented to establish and elucidate the Thermostat Hypothesis – historical temperature stability of the Earth, theoretical considerations, satellite photos, and a description of the equilibrium mechanism. …

Conclusions and Musings

1. The sun puts out more than enough energy to totally roast the earth. It is kept from doing so by the clouds reflecting about a third of the sun’s energy back to space. As near as we can tell, this system of cloud formation to limit temperature rises has never failed.

2. This reflective shield of clouds forms in the tropics in response to increasing temperature.

3. As tropical temperatures continue to rise, the reflective shield is assisted by the formation of independent heat engines called thunderstorms. These cool the surface in a host of ways, move heat aloft, and convert heat to work.

4. Like cumulus clouds, thunderstorms also form in response to increasing temperature.

5. Because they are temperature driven, as tropical temperatures rise, tropical thunderstorms and cumulus production increase. These combine to regulate and limit the temperature rise. When tropical temperatures are cool, tropical skies clear and the earth rapidly warms. But when the tropics heat up, cumulus and cumulonimbus put a limit on the warming. This system keeps the earth within a fairly narrow band of temperatures.

6. The earth’s temperature regulation system is based on the unchanging physics of wind, water, and cloud.

7. This is a reasonable explanation for how the temperature of the earth has stayed so stable (or more recently, bi-stable as glacial and interglacial) for hundreds of millions of years.” “The Thermostat Hypothesis

Willis Eschenbach on negative feedback and "The Thermostat Hypothesis"

06/28/2009

Abstract

The Thermostat Hypothesis is that tropical clouds and thunderstorms actively regulate the temperature of the earth. This keeps the earth at a equilibrium temperature.

Several kinds of evidence are presented to establish and elucidate the Thermostat Hypothesis – historical temperature stability of the Earth, theoretical considerations, satellite photos, and a description of the equilibrium mechanism. …

Conclusions and Musings

1. The sun puts out more than enough energy to totally roast the earth. It is kept from doing so by the clouds reflecting about a third of the sun’s energy back to space. As near as we can tell, this system of cloud formation to limit temperature rises has never failed.

2. This reflective shield of clouds forms in the tropics in response to increasing temperature.

3. As tropical temperatures continue to rise, the reflective shield is assisted by the formation of independent heat engines called thunderstorms. These cool the surface in a host of ways, move heat aloft, and convert heat to work.

4. Like cumulus clouds, thunderstorms also form in response to increasing temperature.

5. Because they are temperature driven, as tropical temperatures rise, tropical thunderstorms and cumulus production increase. These combine to regulate and limit the temperature rise. When tropical temperatures are cool, tropical skies clear and the earth rapidly warms. But when the tropics heat up, cumulus and cumulonimbus put a limit on the warming. This system keeps the earth within a fairly narrow band of temperatures.

6. The earth’s temperature regulation system is based on the unchanging physics of wind, water, and cloud.

7. This is a reasonable explanation for how the temperature of the earth has stayed so stable (or more recently, bi-stable as glacial and interglacial) for hundreds of millions of years.” “The Thermostat Hypothesis

Lucia demolishes RealClimate's rationalization of the nonexistence of the tropical troposphere hot spot "fingerprint" predicted by AGW theory

12/19/2008


It turns out that back in Dec. 2007, “The Group” at Real Climate informed readers that the hot spot was expected for any source of warming. The tone of the RC blog post would suggest that this information is widely accepted and agreed on by everyone. They appear to support their contention using a single GISS model run using an increase in solar forcing not experienced by the actual earth.

Deviating from scientific cultural practices, they fail to suggest their readers refer to a recent widely respected consensus document that might seem to contradict their own views about the cause of the “hot spot” interpretation. (Interested readers can refer to section 9.2.2 of the WG1 report for the IPCC AR4.)

I have circled the plates illustrating the results for well mixed GHG’s and those for all sources of warming combined. As you see, according to the AR4– a consensus document written for the UN’s IPCC and published in 2007 — models predict the effect of GHG’s as distinctly different from that of solar or volcanic forcings. In particular: The tropical tropospheric hotspots appears in the plate discussing heating by GHG’s and does not appear when the warming results from other causes. …

Now, the answer to the question!

Who expects tropical tropospheric hot spot from any and all sources of warming?”

Evidently, “The Group” at Real Climate, and those readers of Real Climate who either do not read or do not believe section 9.2.2 of the WG1 report for the IPCC AR4.

Who thinks the tropical tropospheric hot spot is a fingerprint of GHGs? People who read and believe section 9.2.2 of WG1’s contribution to the IPCC AR4.” “Who expects a tropical tropospheric hot spot from ANY and ALL sources of warming?

Read the comments to Lucia’s blog, very interesting.

Lucia demolishes RealClimate’s rationalization of the nonexistence of the tropical troposphere hot spot "fingerprint" predicted by AGW theory

12/19/2008


It turns out that back in Dec. 2007, “The Group” at Real Climate informed readers that the hot spot was expected for any source of warming. The tone of the RC blog post would suggest that this information is widely accepted and agreed on by everyone. They appear to support their contention using a single GISS model run using an increase in solar forcing not experienced by the actual earth.

Deviating from scientific cultural practices, they fail to suggest their readers refer to a recent widely respected consensus document that might seem to contradict their own views about the cause of the “hot spot” interpretation. (Interested readers can refer to section 9.2.2 of the WG1 report for the IPCC AR4.)

I have circled the plates illustrating the results for well mixed GHG’s and those for all sources of warming combined. As you see, according to the AR4– a consensus document written for the UN’s IPCC and published in 2007 — models predict the effect of GHG’s as distinctly different from that of solar or volcanic forcings. In particular: The tropical tropospheric hotspots appears in the plate discussing heating by GHG’s and does not appear when the warming results from other causes. …

Now, the answer to the question!

Who expects tropical tropospheric hot spot from any and all sources of warming?”

Evidently, “The Group” at Real Climate, and those readers of Real Climate who either do not read or do not believe section 9.2.2 of the WG1 report for the IPCC AR4.

Who thinks the tropical tropospheric hot spot is a fingerprint of GHGs? People who read and believe section 9.2.2 of WG1’s contribution to the IPCC AR4.” “Who expects a tropical tropospheric hot spot from ANY and ALL sources of warming?

Read the comments to Lucia’s blog, very interesting.

"Amazon doomed by too much clean air"

05/07/2008

The lungs of the planet – the Amazon – could be wiped out within half a century as a result of too much clean air, writes Roger Highfield

Rehashes the old “aerosols cooled the planet prior to 1975 masking AGW” bit of the catechism.

"Amazon doomed by too much clean air"

05/07/2008

The lungs of the planet – the Amazon – could be wiped out within half a century as a result of too much clean air, writes Roger Highfield

Rehashes the old “aerosols cooled the planet prior to 1975 masking AGW” bit of the catechism.

More propaganda from the Church of AGW

05/06/2008

Tropics insects ‘face extinction’‘”

Nonsense. Warmer climate is healthier climate. The tropics have the greatest diversity of insect species on Earth. More insect species evolved and evolve there than any other region. The tropics have been considerably warmer in the past. Warm is good.

More propaganda from the Church of AGW

05/06/2008

Tropics insects ‘face extinction’‘”

Nonsense. Warmer climate is healthier climate. The tropics have the greatest diversity of insect species on Earth. More insect species evolved and evolve there than any other region. The tropics have been considerably warmer in the past. Warm is good.